Becoming an Italian citizen / 4

On Friday I collected my sworn translations (traduzioni giurate – apparently the only acceptable level of legalisation for citizenship applications in Italy) from an agency that curiously specialises in translations from Romanian to Italian, for the modest sum of €135,70… and so I was all set to make the on-line application – or so I thought!

I logged into the Department of Civil Liberties and Immigration (DLCI) section of the interior ministry website and clicked on Cittadinanza and then Compila e invia domanda in the left-hand menu bar.

I immediately ran into the first problem: deciding the grounds for my application, residency or marriage to an Italian.

By law as an EU citizen resident in Italy for at least four years (in my case 17) and married to an Italian for at least two I could have gone for either option, although I felt applying on grounds of residency (so-called ‘naturalisation’) better reflected the personal journey that has brought me to this point in the first place.

However, in the end pragmatism carried the day: citizenship through marriage is considered a right providing certain conditions are met, while ‘naturalisation’ is granted on a discretionary basis, so I plumped for the first option, reckoning it would be the quickest and easiest way to go.

And thank goodness I did: after clicking on the relevant application form I discovered that I would ‘only’ have to go through 17 steps, rather than 23!

However, it soon became clear that I would have to provide a lot more information than had been specified in the introductory section on the ministry website. Specifically, I was expected to give a full residency history, including dates, from the age of 14, and also my migration history with respect to Italy, including the details of my very old and fading green permesso di soggiorno (which I applied for in 1998 and had renewed indefinitely in 2003, and which miraculously I still have).

At step 15 I was asked to provide the details of a marca da bollo telematico (official revenue stamp) which had only been given passing mention in the introductory blurb, and which I had naively assumed to be the €200 application fee (see Becoming an Italian citizen / 1) – but no! The instructions manual that accompanies the on-line application form shed no light on the problem, and it was only by searching on internet that I discovered I also needed to buy a separate revenue stamp for €16.

At that point I gave up in frustration.

The following morning I went to the Monterotondo registry office to see if I could access my residency history for Italy. I naively hoped my local public administration might ‘talk’ to the one in Rome, where I was resident at no fewer than three (possibly five – who can remember?) different addresses over the course of 11 years. Of course it does not. The clerk told me smugly that he could give me the information for Monterotondo, but that for my Rome residency history I would have to go to the central registry office in Rome. Ugh.

So I then set about exploring the possibility of accessing the information on-line, via the Roma Capitale website. Having established that residency history is indeed among the certificates available on internet I applied for the official credentials needed to log into the system, only then to discover that the service is available exclusively to people who are resident in Rome.

Not to be fazed (17 years in Italy must surely count for something!), I called Poste italiane to see if their Sportello Amico service designed to simplify dealings with the public administration might provide such a certificate. Apparently, it does!

So tomorrow I will go to the post office first thing in a final bid to avoid the traipse into Rome.

If I am successful, I may even get my application in by lunchtime!

My only consolation is that had I made the application on grounds of naturalisation I would also have had to provide a record of my declared personal income and that of my husband for the last three years, as well as details of property ownership in Italy and the UK.

For Becoming an Italian citizen / 1 click here

For Becoming an Italian citizen / 2 click here

For Becoming an Italian citizen / 3 click here

2 thoughts on “Becoming an Italian citizen / 4

  1. HI, I am friends with a woman in Padova who is very close to her citizenship. She recently received her decree! However, I am concerned that she is missing something somewhere… because they are asking her to provide basic documents at the prefettura which she must have previously submitted. And we both thought she would be swearing her oath soon, but they are talking to her about September! Which is 6 months from now, and 6 months is the timeframe in which they state the oath must be taken. And another two months to receive her passport! Are you at all familiar with this? Is it normal to receive the decree and then have to wait 6 months to swear?

    1. Hi William, forgive me for taking so long to reply. I was in fact summoned to the prefecture on Tuesday and yes, I can confirm that you are indeed required to provide all the basic documents, including a print-out of the completed on-line application form. See my latest post Re the oath-swearing, my understanding is that it must happen within six months of receiving the ministerial or presidential decree, so September sounds about right to me. Good luck.

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